Wednesday, August 8, 2018

A Place at the Table


The United Methodist Association of Ministers with Disabilities met at Gallaudet University for a three-day conference for the purpose of education, advocacy and support (August 1-3, 2018). The theme was “Taking Our Place at the Table: DisABILITY Leadership Academy.”

The event included a number of speakers: the Rev. Stephanie Remington from Wesley Theological Seminary’s Lewis Leadership Center; the Rev. E. Michelle Ledder from the General Commission on Religion and Race; the Rev. Jackson Day from the General Board of Church and Society; and the Rev. Anthony Hunt from the Baltimore-Washington Conference Board of Ordained Ministry.

Back, Left to right: Rev. Ruthann Simpson (Pen-Del), Rev. Dave Goss (EPA), Rev. Bill Downing (Pen-Del), and Rev. Paul Crikelair (EPA). Front: Bishop Peggy Johnson.

Leadership development was the key component of this event; and the group strategized about how to promote more opportunities to be in leadership and inclusion in the UMC. People with disabilities, even those who are ordained or commissioned, often find themselves talked about but not present at the table.

Jesus understood the importance of table ministry. Much of his ministry included gatherings around meals and tables. It seemed like he was always doing radical acts of inclusion at the tables where he sat.

Jesus ate with sinners and tax collectors and got into trouble with the Pharisees for that (Matthew 9:11). He allowed a woman with a questionable past to wash his feet at a table in the home of a Pharisee, and he gets grief for that too (Luke 7:36-50). We see him including Mary of Bethany around the teaching table instead of sending her to the kitchen to cook with her sister Martha (Luke 10:38-42).

Left to right: Deacon Russell Ewell (Co-chair of the UM Association of Ministers with
Disabilities), Rev. Janine Delaunay (Co-chair of UMAMD with Russell), Bishop Peggy Johnson.

Jesus gives us a parable about the great banquet that includes all those whom the world excludes (Luke 14:15-24), especially those with disabilities. In addition, he didn’t shy away from literally turning over tables of greed and extortion when the place of prayer for the Gentiles was being defiled by the sale of sacrificial animals and the changing of coins. (John 2:11-12).

In each case the Lord was widening the circle at each table, teaching the world the unimaginably grace-filled, inclusive love of God.

Jesus’ most radical act of table turning would be the Last Supper. At that table Jesus himself becomes love incarnate. The Lamb of God becomes the sacrificial lamb for the sins of the world. The bread and the wine are his very body and blood. His death on the cross seals forever the opportunity for everyone, everywhere, throughout all of history to be a part of the family of God and seated at Christ’s table.

At this disability conference at Gallaudet we once again committed ourselves to sharing the good news that God unconditionally includes and loves people with disabilities. I ask you, the church, to think of ways that your church, your ministries, your worship and outreach programs can include this amazingly gifted community. Then widen your table to welcome all.


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